The Second Disc

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Ipanema, Again: “Getz/Gilberto” Restored To Original Mix For New SACD and Vinyl LP

with 3 comments

Bossa nova, translated, literally means “new trend.” And as 1964 began, with the British Invasion taking flight, America was also experiencing a Brazilian Invasion thanks to this new trend in popular music and jazz. Identified by gentle acoustic guitar and sometimes piano, and often adorned with subtle string or horn accents, bossa nova was based on the rhythms of the samba. It soon was adapted on stages from the concert hall to Broadway, spawned the “lounge” genre and influenced countless musicians across the genre divide. But the album that started the American bossa nova craze was undisputedly Getz/Gilberto, a Verve LP produced by Creed Taylor and featuring Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto with notable cameos by Gilberto’s young wife Astrud. Getz/Gilberto has remained in print since its initial release and has been issued in nearly every format conceivable, including SACD. Analogue Productions (the label responsible for the amazing Nat “King” Cole multichannel discs) will reissue Getz/Gilberto yet again on SACD on June 14, but with a difference. According to Analogue, “the original master tapes for this title had not been used since 1980 previous to this reissue. Also, for this Analogue Productions reissue the decision was made to master and present this album as it was originally mixed to master tape. With only one exception – the [Kevin Gray-mastered LP] Speakers Corner reissue – all versions of this title to date have had the channels incorrectly reversed.” (This is quickly distinguishable by Astrud Gilberto’s vocal on the seminal “The Girl from Ipanema” coming from the left channel.)

Getz/Gilberto was an instant sensation. Tenor saxophonist Getz was accompanied by Joao Gilberto on guitar and vocals, Sebastiao Neto on bass, Milton Banana on drums and the man most closely associated with bossa nova, Antonio Carlos Jobim, on piano. Born in 1927, Jobim was one of the composers (primarily with Luis Bonfa) of the 1959 film Black Orpheus, credited with introducing bossa nova to a wider audience despite its harsher, more percussion-driven style on the film soundtrack. Jobim’s association with Black Orpheus actually dated back to 1956 when he and Vinicius de Moraes supplied music, including the song “Someone to Light Up My Life,” for the original stage play. Stan Getz had discovered the new sound on a trip to Brazil, and in 1962 released Jazz Samba, a collaboration with Charlie Byrd that is recognized as the first major American album in the style. Creed Taylor was in the producer’s chair for this auspicious collection. Two Jobim songs were heard on Jazz Samba, “Desafinado” and “One Note Samba.” He teamed with Bonfa for Jazz Samba Encore! in 1963 with three Jobim compositions, “I Only Dance Samba,” “How Insensitive” and “O Morro Não Tem Vez.” Getz was poised for a breakthrough when he teamed with Joao Gilberto for Getz/Gilberto.

Hit the jump for more on this jazz classic including the track listing, discographical info and pre-order link!

A full six of the eight tracks were Jobim’s this times, including “Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars),” with English lyrics by Gene Lees, a reprise of “Só danço samba (I Only Dance Samba)” and the song that virtually became bossa nova’s national anthem, “Garota de Ipanema” or The Girl from Ipanema” in Norman Gimbel’s translation. Jobim and de Moraes had written the song in 1962, and Pery Ribeiro was the first to record it. Astrud Gilberto’s breathy, untrained and sensual vocals, however, brought it to a new place entirely, complementing Getz’s smoky saxophone riffs. Getz/Gilberto cleaned up at the 1965 Grammy Awards, taking home the gold for Album of the Year, Best Jazz Instrumental Album – Individual or Group and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical. “The Girl from Ipanema,”already a No. 5 pop hit and Adult Contemporary chart-topper, won Record of the Year. (Jerry Herman took Song of the Year for “Hello, Dolly!” and The Beatles were awarded Best New Artist.) Jazz and commercial pop had truly become one and the same, always an objective of producer Creed Taylor. Another jazz album wouldn’t take home the Grammys’ Album of the Year until Herbie Hancock’s River: The Joni Letters in 2008!

The reverberations of the bossa nova craze are still heard today in jazz, chillout, lounge and pop music. If you’d like to get in on the ground floor to hear where it all started in America, Analogue’s remastered hybrid SACD of Getz/Gilberto might be for you! The track listing and pre-order link appears below.  The title will also be released by Analogue on a 45-RPM vinyl record.

Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto, Getz/Gilberto (Verve V6-8545, 1964 – reissued Analogue Productions CVRJ-8545-SA, 2011)

  1. The Girl from Ipanema
  2. Doralice
  3. Para Machuchar Meu Coração
  4. Desafinado
  5. Corcovado
  6. Só Danço Samba
  7. O Grande Amor
  8. Vivo Sonhando

Written by Joe Marchese

June 10, 2011 at 09:29

Posted in News, Reissues, Stan Getz

3 Responses

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  1. Honestly, I cannot see how reversing channels from left to right etc. is meaningful. Stereo is an articial thing anyway. Many of the jazz records from this time sound better in mono.

    I bet half of the stereos in this world have the interconnecting cables attached “randomly”.

    If you have a problem with channel reversal, try standing on your head. It makes for a much more focused listening experience! You do not get distracted.

    Kevin

    June 10, 2011 at 10:34

  2. “– all versions of this title to date have had the channels incorrectly reversed.” (This is quickly distinguishable by Astrud Gilberto’s vocal on the seminal “The Girl from Ipanema” coming from the left channel.)”

    I have to disagree with this statement. I have 4 CD versions and only one has Astrud on the left.
    Mobile Fidelity UDCD 607 is on the right. (1994)
    Lasting Impression Music LIM K2HD 036 is on the right. (2009)
    Verve Master Edition 3145214142 is on the right (1997)
    only my cheap Verve P2-10048 has Astrud on the left.

    Unless the statement applies to vinyl versions, which I cannot verify.

    I would have preferred to read a review that compared this newest version with the first two versions listed above considered to be very good.

    “the original master tapes for this title had not been used since 1980 previous to this reissue.” Is a big statement and I have to wonder if it is true based on the false statement on Astrud’s voice.

    Paul

    October 6, 2011 at 23:05

    • Thanks for reading, Paul. This article is not a review, nor does it purport to be. The majority of the statements which you’ve found objectionable are statements made by Analogue Productions, not by the author (note quotation marks):

      “According to Analogue, ‘the original master tapes for this title had not been used since 1980 previous to this reissue. Also, for this Analogue Productions reissue the decision was made to master and present this album as it was originally mixed to master tape. With only one exception – the [Kevin Gray-mastered LP] Speakers Corner reissue – all versions of this title to date have had the channels incorrectly reversed.'”

      As this was not a review, and no review of the new SACD is currently scheduled, I cannot chime in as to the veracity of Analogue’s statements. That said, I’ve been very happy with their work in the past, and they’re a most reputable company. But if you search around the ‘net, there are many, many threads on various audiophile sites addressing your concerns. It certainly speaks for the endurance of the music that this album, its proper soundstage and its master tapes can still be a hot-button topic this many years later. Happy hunting, and thanks again!

      Joe Marchese

      October 6, 2011 at 23:47


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